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Chronic Wounds and Infections

  • Eran Shavit
  • Gregory Schultz
Chapter
  • 31 Downloads
Part of the Updates in Clinical Dermatology book series (UCD)

Abstract

Dermatologists are exposed to wound healing during their training. Unfortunately, only minimal time is dedicated to this important subfield of medicine. Nevertheless, solid background in dermatology provides training physicians a much easier route to expand their knowledge of wound healing. Chronic wounds are opened and have the propensity to be infected; this may stall the healing process in milder cases, but may actually have more devastating outcome if the infection is not well controlled. There are some conditions when chronic wounds may appear infected, but they are not, and it is essential to differentiate imminent infection from conditions that may merely mimic infection. Finally, we would like to shed some light and provide enablers for dermatologist in wound healing with emphasis on infection control.

Keywords

Dermatologists Wound healing Chronic wounds Wound dressings Infections 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eran Shavit
    • 1
  • Gregory Schultz
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Dermatology, Department of MedicineWomen’s College Hospital, University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics & GynecologyInstitute of Wound Research & University of Florida Shands HospitalGainesvilleUSA

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