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Policy-Making Environments and Locales

  • Robert G. PicardEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Palgrave Global Media Policy and Business book series (GMPB)

Abstract

This chapter explains the policy environment and how media and communications policy is made at various levels (global, regional, national, provincial and local) and that the processes and policy tools available in each differ. It presents a model of institutional influences on policy making and how state structures and administrative agencies affect processes and outcomes, how economic and social institutions affect policy making, and the issues of policy capture, state capture and media capture.

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Suggested Readings

  1. Hague, Rod, Martin Harrop, and John McCormick. 2016. Comparative Government and Politics: An Introduction. 10th ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  2. Hale, Thomas, and David Held, eds. 2011. The Handbook of Transnational Governance: Institutions and Innovations. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
  3. Hanretty, Chris, and Christel Koop. 2012. Measuring the Formal Independence of Regulatory Agencies. Journal of European Public Policy 19: 2, 198–216.Google Scholar
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  5. Schulz, Wolfgang, Peggy Valcke, and Kristina Irion, eds. 2013. The Independence of the Media and its Regulatory Agencies. Bristol: Intellect Books.Google Scholar
  6. Smith, Rachael Craufurd. 2015. Determining Regulatory Competence for Audiovisual Media Services in the European Union. Journal of Media Law 3 (2): 263–285Google Scholar
  7. van Cuilenburg, Jan. 2003. Media Policy Paradigm Shifts: Toward New Communications Policy Paradigm. European Journal of Communications 18 (2): 181–207.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Reuters InstituteUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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