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Introduction: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood…

  • Tracey L. MolletEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter considers the complex relationship between Disney fairy tales and the American Dream, examining the similarities in these two mythical narratives. This chapter also charts the current status of scholarship on the Disney fairy tale, underlining the ways in which these narratives have been critiqued for their Americanisation of their canonised literary counterparts. It concludes that both the American Dream and the Disney fairy tale were born out of the Great Depression in the 1930s and that they attempt to sustain core elements of American identity. Each displays a peculiar adaptability throughout history, modifying key components of their narratives in accordance with socio-cultural change. Crucially, they present a specific fairy tale version of America back to itself, one infused with the nostalgia of the nation’s past and the promise of modernity and innovation in its future.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Media and CommunicationUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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