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The Renewal Era (2009–2013)

  • Tracey L. MolletEmail author
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Abstract

There are a number of significant social, economic and political developments that characterise this era of Disney fairy tales. Each of these shifts also reflects a concurrent transformation in the scope and nature of the American Dream at this stage in America’s cultural history. The impact of Hurricane Katrina; the economic crash of 2008; the election of Barack Obama; third wave feminism; and the legalisation of gay marriage all play into the narratives of The Princess and the Frog (Clements and Musker 2009), Tangled (Greno and Howard 2010) and Frozen (Buck and Lee 2013). Amidst this substantial degree of change, there remained a degree of socially conservative nostalgia. Nostalgia had been a prolific theme in American popular culture since the break of the twenty-first century and, indeed, continued to figure into the kinds of narratives seen in these Disney productions. The Disney fairy tale thus continues to be the site of an interplay between nostalgia for the past and progression towards a new inclusive America. This era is characterised as one of renewal for the Disney studios, as it is noted that the studio ‘renewed’ its traditional interest in fairy tale narratives following the success of Enchanted (Lima 2007).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Media and CommunicationUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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