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The Reboot Era (2014–2017)

  • Tracey L. MolletEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter outlines the unique characteristics of Disney’s rebooted fairy tale films: Maleficent (Stromberg 2014), Cinderella (Branagh 2015) and Beauty and the Beast (Condon 2017). Intertextuality and ‘world building’ define these productions, as these fairy tale narratives become more aware of their function and position within America’s cultural paradigm. Much like Enchanted (Lima 2007) and Once Upon a Time (Horowitz and Kitsis 2011–2018), their status as live action feature films serves to situate the Disney fairy tale within the real world. It is also argued that this era is defined by correction, and in some cases, a “contingent nostalgia” (Mollet, Refractory 13, 2019a). Disney seeks to satisfy its audience’s desire for a happy ending, whilst ensuring that any disagreeable, exclusionary elements of the fairy tale narrative are eliminated. In an era characterised by the rise to prominence of Donald Trump, it is of note that these fairy tales take aim at toxic masculinity and white masculine privilege. This positions Disney’s productions away from the ultra-conservatism of the Trump administration, advocating a more liberally inclusive manifestation of the American Dream.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Media and CommunicationUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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