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And They Lived Happily Ever After … in America

  • Tracey L. MolletEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter summarises the key contextual developments in the Disney fairy tale in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It proposes that there has been a substantial renegotiation of the nature of the Disney fairy tale following the significant transformation of American society throughout the past century. Like the American Dream, the Disney fairy tale has proven highly adaptive to changing conceptions of Americanism and imbues its heroes and heroines with American values. Post 9/11, however, these values are challenged and become significantly more complex, resulting in a reframing of the nature of heroism. It is also suggested that these narratives, and specifically, Disney’s live action productions, construct the United States as an inclusive utopian space: a fantasy zone where dreams can come for those who wish to pursue them, insisting upon the relevance of fairy tale elements for the contemporary manifestation of the American Dream.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Media and CommunicationUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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