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Comparative Notes on the Context of Reception and Immigrant Entrepreneurship in New York City, Washington, DC, El Paso, Barcelona, and Paris

  • Ernesto CastañedaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Urban Book Series book series (UBS)

Abstract

The chapter provides a comparison of immigrant businesses in different cities in the United States and Europe. The chapter draws from several projects conducted by the author. It compares small ethnic businesses in various neighborhoods in order to discuss general patterns and specific arrangements between immigrants and the rate and type of ventures that they start. This chapter shows how the way that different city governments and civil society receive and treat immigrants impacts their entrepreneurial behavior. One should be careful when generalizing about the innate business ability or the propensity of a particular race or ethnicity to engage in commerce or entrepreneurship. It also shows how often storefronts do not necessarily map with the majority of people living in a street or neighborhood.

Keywords

Immigrant entrepreneurship Urban revitalization Ethnic enclaves Economic survival Making ends meet 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Pau Serra del Pozo, Maura Fennelly, Daniel Jenks, and Fernando Rocha provided valuable feedback and assistance. Many thanks to Cathy Yang Liu for the invitation to participate and her valuable editorial assistance, and to Lauren Forbes for coordinating this project. I would like to thank Sonya Grier, Anthony Kwame Harrison, Guillaume Johnson, and the rest of the Race in the Market Place (RIM) Network and the participants in their photo-dialogue Paris workshop, during which I took the set of pictures from Paris used here.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyAmerican UniversityWashingtonUSA

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