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Relationships with Other Therapeutic Approaches

  • Harry Procter
  • David A. Winter
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Part of the Palgrave Texts in Counselling and Psychotherapy book series (PTCP)

Abstract

PRCP is compared with psychoanalysis, cognitive behaviour therapy, humanistic approaches, and systemic therapy, looking at their similarities and differences under a number of headings. PRCP is then discussed in relation to varieties of constructivism, social constructionism, and psychotherapy integration

Keywords

Psychoanalysis Cognitive-behaviour therapy Humanistic therapies Systemic therapy Constructivism Constructionism Psychotherapy integration 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry Procter
    • 1
  • David A. Winter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HertfordshireHatfieldUK

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