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Working with Families and Couples

  • Harry Procter
  • David A. Winter
Chapter
  • 9 Downloads
Part of the Palgrave Texts in Counselling and Psychotherapy book series (PTCP)

Abstract

The advantages and process of working with families are considered, as are methods of interviewing, including working with problems and goals. The process of change in family intervention is discussed together with particular techniques including the reflecting team.

Keywords

Working with families and couples Interviewing families Bow-tie Change in family therapy Reflecting teams 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry Procter
    • 1
  • David A. Winter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HertfordshireHatfieldUK

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