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A bibliography for the use of DNA in human identification

  • B. S. Weir
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Issues in Genetics and Evolution book series (CIGE, volume 4)

Abstract

A bibliography of material relating to the use of DNA in human identification is presented. It includes bibliographies previously compiled by the author and other individuals, the DNA Legal Assistance Subunit of the FBI, and references from all the chapters in this volume.

Key words

DNA PCR STR VNTR RFLP forensic science paternity 

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Introductory materials

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. S. Weir
    • 1
  1. 1.Program in Statistical Genetics, Department of StatisticsNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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