Advertisement

Naming and Claiming Discourse

The “Practice” of Landscape and Place in Human Geography
  • Gunhild Setten
Chapter

Abstract

This is a paper about concepts, classification and the ordering of knowledge. Conceptualising the world consists of labelling knowledge by another name — we employ suitable concepts using our worldly experiences and knowledges. Withers (1996: 275) claims that “classification is intrinsic to knowledge”, hence, “we label knowledge as an inevitable consequence of ordering the world”. the relationship between concepts and categories and the world is thus dialectical — concepts and categories “are contexts and subjects of geographical experiences” (Relph 1985: 21). Therefore, there is a need to always “be sensitive to the reciprocal relationships between geographical ‘texts’ and the epistemological contexts of their production and use” (Withers 1996: 275). Consequently, the dialectics of language (i.e. its concepts and classifications) and their relationship to the world provide meaning and direction to the world. Even more importantly, dialectics of language annex the world.

Keywords

Human Geography Cultural Landscape Main Entry Dialectical Relationship American Geographer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Basso, K.H. (1996). Wisdom Sits in Places. Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.Google Scholar
  2. Casey, E. (1993). Getting Back Into Place. Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-world. Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Casey, E. (2001). Body, Self and Landscape, a Geophilosophical Inquiry Into the Place-world. In P.C. Adams, S. Hoelscher & K.E. Till (Eds.), Textures of Place. Exploring Humanist Geographies (pp. 403–425). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  4. Cosgrove, D. (1990). Environmental Thought and Action: Pre-modern and Post-modern. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers NS, 5, 344–358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cosgrove, D. (2000). Cultural Landscape. In R.J. Johnston, D. Gregory, G. Pratt & M. Watts (Eds.), The Dictionary of Human Geograph.y 4th Ed. (pp. 138–141). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  6. Cloke, P. & Jones, O. (2001). Dwelling, Place and Landscape: An Orchard in Somerset. Environment and Planning A, 33 (4), 649–666.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Cresswell, T. (1996). In Place/Out of Place Geography, Ideology, and Transgression. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  8. Cresswell, T. (2003). Landscape and the Obliteration of Practice. In K. Anderson, M. Domosh, S. Pile & N. Thrift (Eds.), Handbook of Cultural Geography (pp. 269–281). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  9. Crouch, D. & Parker, G. (2003). ‘Digging-up’ Utopia? Space, Practice and Land Use Heritage. Geoforum, 34, 395–408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Duncan, J.D. (1980). the Superorganic in American Cultural Geography. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 70 (2), 181–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Duncan, J.D. (1994). Placelessness. R.J Johnston, D. Gregory & D.M Smith (Eds.), The Dictionary of Human Geography. 3rd Ed. (p. 444). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  12. Duncan, J.D. (2000). Placelessness. In R.J Johnston, D. Gregory, G. Pratt & M. Watts (Eds.), The Dictionary of Human Geography. 4th Ed. (pp. 585–586). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  13. Entrikin, JN. (1991). The Betweenness of Place: Towards a Geography of Modernity. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  14. Foucault, M. (2002). The Archaeology of Knowledge. London: Routledge Classics.Google Scholar
  15. Geelmuyden, A.K. (1993). Landskapsanalyse — planredskap og erkjennelsesvei. Byggekunst, 3, 152–157.Google Scholar
  16. Gerber, J. (1997). Beyond Dualism — the Social Construction of Nature and the Natural and Social Construction of Human Beings. Progress in Human Geography, 21 (1), 1–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Johnston, R.J., Gregory, D., Haggett, P., Smith, D., & Stoddart, D.R. (Eds.) (1981a). The Dictionary of Human Geography. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  18. Johnston, R.J., Gregory, D., Haggett, P., Smith, D., & Stoddart, D.R. (1981b). Editor’s Introduction. In R.J. Johnston, D. Gregory, P. Haggett, D. Smith & D.R. Stoddart (Eds.), The Dictionary of Human Geography (pp. x–xii). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  19. Johnston, R.J., Gregory, D. & Smith, D.M. (Eds.) (1986). The Dictionary of Human Geography. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  20. Johnston, R.J., Gregory, D. & Smith, D.M. (Eds.) (1994a). The Dictionary of Human Geography. 3rd Ed. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  21. Johnston, R.J., Gregory, D. & Smith, D.M. (1994b). Preface to the Third Edition. In R.J. Johnston, D. Gregory & D.M. Smith (Eds.), The Dictionary of Human Geography. 3rd Ed. (pp. vii–viii). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  22. Johnston, R.J., Gregory, D., Pratt, G. & Watts, M. (Eds.) (2000a). The Dictionary of Human Geography. 4th Ed. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  23. Johnston, R.J., Gregory, D., Pratt, G., & Watts, M. (2000b). Preface to the Fourth Edition. In R.J. Johnston, D. Gregory, G. Pratt & M. Watts (Eds.), The Dictionary of Human Geography. 4th Ed. (pp. vi–ix). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  24. Jones, M. & Daugstad, K. (1997). Usages of the “Cultural Landscape” Concept in Norwegian and Nordic Landscape Administration. Landscape Research, 22, 267–281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Lippard, L. (1997). The Lure of the Local. Senses of Place in a Multicentered Society. New York: the New Press.Google Scholar
  26. Livingstone, D. (1992). The Geographical Tradition. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers.Google Scholar
  27. Myerson, G. & Rydin, Y. (1996). The Language of Environment. A New Rhetoric. London: UCL Press.Google Scholar
  28. Olwig, K.R. (2002). Landscape, Nature and the Body Politic. From Britain’s Renaissance to America’s New World. Madison: the University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  29. Relph, E. (1976). Place and Placelessness. London: Pion.Google Scholar
  30. Relph, E. (1985). Geographical Experiences and Being-in-the-World: the Phenomenological Origins of Geography. In D. Seamon & R. Mugerauer (Eds.), Dwelling, Place and Environment. Towards a Phenomenology of Person and World (pp. 15–31). Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.Google Scholar
  31. Ricoeur, P. (1971). the Model of the Text: Meaningful Action Considered as Text. Social Research. An International Quarterly of the Social Sciences, 38 (3), 529–562.Google Scholar
  32. Sack, R.D. (2000). Casey, E.S. the Fate of Place: A Philosophical History. Book review. Progress in Human Geography, 24, 136–137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Setten, G. (1999). Den ‘nye’ kulturgeografiens landskapsbegrep. Nordisk Samhällsgeografisk Tidskrift, 29, 55–71.Google Scholar
  34. Setten, G. (2001). Farmers, Planners, and the Moral Message of Landscape and Nature. Ethics, Place and Environment, 4 (3), 220–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Setten, G. (2004). the Habitus, the Rule and the Moral Landscape. Cultural Geographies, in press.Google Scholar
  36. Smith, J.M. (1996a). Ramifications of Region and Senses of Place. In C. Earle, K. Mathewson & M. Kenzer (Eds.), Concepts in Human Geography (pp. 189–211). Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  37. Smith, J.M. (1996b). Geographical Rhetoric. Modes and Tropes of Appeal. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 86 (1), 1–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Tuan, Y.F. (1974). Topophilia. A Study of Environmental Perception, Attitudes and Values. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  39. Tuan, Y.F. (1991). Language and the Making of Place: A Narrative-descriptive Approach. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 81, 684–696.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Widgren, M. (1997). Landskap eller objekt: Kring kulturminnesvårdens problem att hantera landskapets historia. In J. Brendalsmo, M. Jones, K. Olwig & M. Widgren (Eds.), Landskapet som historie (pp. 5–16). NIKU Temahefte 4. Oslo: Norsk Institutt for Kulturminneforskning.Google Scholar
  41. Withers, C.W.J. (1996). Encyclopaedism, Modernism and the Classification of Geographical Knowledge. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers NS, 21, 275–298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunhild Setten
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeographyNorwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheimNorway

Personalised recommendations