Advertisement

The Jacobites

  • John Stuart Shaw
Chapter
  • 15 Downloads
Part of the British History in Perspective book series (BHP)

Abstract

This short chapter allows us to step back a bit from the activities of the political establishment. It provides a reminder of the Jacobite presence during the reigns of the first two Georges; and it deals with the strength of the commitment to Jacobitism in Scotland until it became a spent force after the ’45. The concern is not, however, to spend time on the threat the Jacobites posed to the Hanoverian regime. The aim in considering the strength of Scottish Jacobitism is to emphasise that the ruling regime in Scotland did not have an overwhelming consensus on their side. The Jacobites were a substantial presence in Scottish life and, although the Whigs dominated politics in Scotland as in England from the accession of George I, political accord did not prevail throughout the community. During Ilay’s time as manager, the people in power in the Scottish Hanoverian political elite dealt with unsympathetic elements by means of careful management, persuasion and the use of power where necessary. The resources of the state were great enough to keep Jacobitism in check in England and Scotland in peaceful times.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    See H. T. Dickinson, ‘The Jacobite Challenge’, in Michael Lynch (ed.), Jacobitism and the ’45 (London, 1995), p. 7.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Allan Macinnes, Clanship, Commerce and the House of Stuart, 1603–1788 (East Linton, 1996), p. 181.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Eveline Cruickshanks and Jeremy Black (eds), The Jacobite Challenge (Edinburgh, 1988), p. 4.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Jeremy Black, Culloden and the ’45 (Stroud, 1990), pp. 63–5.Google Scholar
  5. 6.
    Bruce Lenman, The Jacobite Risings in Britain 1689–1746 (London, 1980), pp. 222–3.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Stuart Shaw 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Stuart Shaw

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations