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Integrated Pest Management Of Bacterial Fruit Blotch Of Cucurbits

  • Ron R. Walcott
Chapter
Part of the Integrated Management of Plant Pests and Diseases book series (IMPD, volume 3)

Abstract

Bacterial fruit blotch (BFB) is the most economically important bacterial disease of cucurbits worldwide. The pathogen is seed transmitted and affects all stages of many cucurbit crops eventually causing destructive fruit rots. Like many phytobacterial diseases, the chemical options for BFB management are limited and primarily include copper based compounds. Additionally, the unavailability of commercial cucurbits cultivars with BFB resistance makes disease management difficult. Out of necessity, BFB management involves an integrated approach that seeks to exclude primary inoculum through the production of clean seeds by isolating seed production fields seed field inspection and certification, seed health testing, seedling inspection, and prophylactic copper-based management. Thus far, despite the efforts to exclude Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli, BFB outbreaks continue to occur sporadically worldwide. To develop a more effective integrated disease management strategy, a better understanding of BFB epidemiology and pathogenesis is needed in fruit and seed production environments. Additionally, understanding the role of blossoms in seed infection has revealed potential avenues for integrated disease management. This chapter will explore the current understanding of the biology and epidemiology of BFB and the integrated disease management strategies currently employed.

Keywords

Seed Treatment Primary Inoculum Integrate Disease Management Peroxyacetic Acid Watermelon Seed 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ron R. Walcott
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant PathologyThe University of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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