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Information and Communication Technologies: The Penultimate Interactive Information-Rich Environment

  • Delia NeumanEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

Building on Chap. 2’s exploration of the natures and affordances of various information-rich environments, this chapter focuses specifically on the environment offered by the Internet and the World Wide Web. It extends the earlier discussion of interactivity to position it as the basic learning affordance of this penultimate information-rich environment, and it explains how interactivity underlies the capability of information and communication technologies to provide both logistical and conceptual advantages. Because research on the unique learning affordances of the Internet  /  Web environment is still relatively limited, the chapter draws on earlier research as well as on a strong theoretical base to suggest the inherent possibilities for learning with information available here. The chapter argues that many of the affordances presented in Chap. 2 apply in this environment and that several key affordances and combinations of affordances that are uniquely present here seem to hold special promise for twenty-first-century learning—distributed processing and collaboration, discourse strategies and distributed processing, and collaboration and discourse strategies.

Keywords

Collaborative Learning Information Object Knowledge Construction Metacognitive Knowledge Online Learning Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Information Science and TechnologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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