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Cereal Grains in Flat Bread Production

  • Jalal Qarooni
Chapter

Abstract

The various flat breads made from all types of cereal grain are probably among the oldest food products prepared by man. Before commerce between ancient civilizations became a reality, cereal grains cultivated in distinct parts of the world were made into different types of flat breads, which constituted the major sources of nourishment. Today, wheat and barley are the essential ingredients in a large number of flat breads in many parts of western and central Asia, southern Europe, and North Africa. Flat breads are prepared from sorghum and millet flour in many parts of Africa. Corn and corn flour are the basic ingredients for tortilla and arepa production in the Americas. Rye, barley, and oats constitute the essential ingredient for a variety of flat breads in many parts of Europe, especially the Scandinavian countries. Flat breads from rice flour are still prepared in many Asian countries.

Keywords

Pearl Millet Rice Flour Aleurone Layer Aleurone Cell Corn Kernel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jalal Qarooni
    • 1
  1. 1.HarrisburgUSA

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