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Clinical Evaluation and Management of Diabetic Retinopathy

  • Francis A. L’esperanceJr
Chapter
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Part of the Developments in Nephrology book series (DINE, volume 9)

Abstract

Ophthalmoscopic evaluation with either the direct or indirect ophthalmoscope has been the principal method of assessing the diabetic retina. Slip-lamp examination with a contact lens has proven highly valuable for studying more minute defects in the retinal structures. Photography of the retina, both regular and stereoscopic, has proven useful for carefully documenting retinal changes over long intervals of time.

Keywords

Diabetic Retinopathy Retinal Detachment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Retinal Vessel Neovascular Glaucoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishing, Boston 1986

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  • Francis A. L’esperanceJr

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