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Stage specific transforming genes in lymphoid neoplasms

  • M. A. Lane
  • H. A. F. Stephens
  • M. B. Tobin
  • K. Doherty
Chapter
  • 42 Downloads
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 32)

Abstract

Identification of activated cellular transforming genes in a variety of neoplasms has been greatly facilitated by the use of the NIH 3T3 transfection assay. A unique property of the NIH 3T3 cells is that they have the ability to undergo transformation following integration of dominantly acting genes, possibly because they have already progressed some way down the path toward overt malignancy. These cells have the ability to be transformed by a variety of transforming genes and therefore may represent a multi potential cell capable of responding to many different growth stimulatory signals.

Keywords

Transforming Gene Single Phage Secrete Protein Product Thymic Leukemia Overt Malignancy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Lane
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. A. F. Stephens
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. B. Tobin
    • 1
  • K. Doherty
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular ImmunobiologyDana Farber Cancer InstituteUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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