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Unusual presentations of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in homosexual males

  • S. A. Riggs
  • S. Kalter
  • F. Cabanillas
  • F. B. Hagemeister
  • W. S. Velasquez
  • B. Barlogie
  • P. Salvador
  • P. Mansell
  • E. Hersh
  • J. Butler
Chapter
  • 42 Downloads
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 32)

Abstract

The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), defined by the Center for Disease Control as the presence of either Kaposi’s sarcoma or opportunistic infection in a high-risk individual such as a homosexual male, Haitian, drug abuser, or hemophiliac [1], reached epidemic levels in certain areas of the United States in 1981. Doll and List [2] and Ziegler [3] described the first cases of lymphomas occurring in immunosuppressed homosexual males. By 1983, it became apparent that this population had a greater than expected incidence of central nervous system (NCS) lymphoma and, consequently, the presence of primary CNS lymphoma was incorporated into the definition of AIDS [1]. Since 1980, we have seen 15 homosexual males with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, six of whom had CNS involvement.

Keywords

Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Patient Reactive Lymphadenopathy Bination Chemotherapy Cranial Nerve Lesion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. A. Riggs
    • 1
  • S. Kalter
    • 1
  • F. Cabanillas
    • 1
  • F. B. Hagemeister
    • 1
  • W. S. Velasquez
    • 1
  • B. Barlogie
    • 1
  • P. Salvador
    • 1
  • P. Mansell
    • 2
  • E. Hersh
    • 3
  • J. Butler
    • 4
  1. 1.Departments of HematologyUniversity of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute HoustonUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Cancer PreventionUniversity of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute HoustonUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Clinical ImmunologyUniversity of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute HoustonUSA
  4. 4.Departments of PathologyUniversity of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute HoustonUSA

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