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Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease

  • P. Salem
  • L. El-Hashimi
  • E. Anaissi
  • M. Khalil
  • C. Allam
Chapter
  • 42 Downloads
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 32)

Abstract

Primary intestinal lymphoma is the most common form of extra-nodal lymphomas in the Middle East, accounting for 50% of all extra-nodal and 75% of gastro-intestinal lymphomas in adults [1]. In the West, this disease is less frequent, accounting for 20% of all extra-nodal, and 30% of gastro-intestinal lymphomas [2]. A new form of this lymphoma, immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID), has been shown to be geographically confined primarily to Mediterranean and Middle Eastern countries [3, 4]. In most reports, IPSID was studied and compared to primary intestinal lymphomas as encountered in the West. This study is an attempt to further delineate the distinctive features of IPSID and to compare it to other forms of intestinal lymphomas in the Middle East.

Keywords

Malignant Lymphoma Mesenteric Node Intestinal Fluid Cellular Infiltrate High Grade Malignancy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Salem
    • 1
  • L. El-Hashimi
    • 1
  • E. Anaissi
    • 1
  • M. Khalil
    • 1
  • C. Allam
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical CenterAmerican University of BeirutBeirutLebanon

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