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Mutagenicity Testing of Complex Environmental Mixtures with Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

  • A. P. Li
  • A. L. Brooks
  • C. R. Clark
  • R. W. Shimizu
  • R. L. Hanson
  • J. S. Dutcher
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 27)

Abstract

Because of the positive correlation between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, short-term tests for mutagenicity are used widely as initial screening tests for substances of potential carcinogenicity. The Ames test (Ames et al., 1975) quantitating the reversion of histidine-requiring Salmonella typhimurium auxotrophs to histidine-nonrequiring prototrophs, has been used in different laboratories to study chemical mixtures obtained through extraction of environmental pollutants. A wide data base obtained from the Ames test includes studies of urban air particles (Pitts et al., 1977), automobile exhaust (Huisingh et al., 1978; Ohnishi et al., 1980; Clark et al., 1981), and coal combustion products (Fisher et al., 1979; Clark and Hobbs, 1980). Ames test-directed chemical fractionation has been used as an approach to identify mutagens in complex environmental mixtures (Dutcher et al., 1981).

Keywords

CHINESE Hamster Ovary Cell Automobile Exhaust Ames Test Exhaust Particle Mutation Assay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. P. Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. L. Brooks
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. R. Clark
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. W. Shimizu
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. L. Hanson
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. S. Dutcher
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Inhalation Toxicology Research InstituteAlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research InstituteAlbuquerqueUSA

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