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Source Assessment Sampling System (SASS) Versus Dilution Tunnel Sampling

  • Raymond G. MerrillJr.
  • Joellen Lewtas
  • Robert E. Hall
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 27)

Abstract

Two sampling methods have received increased attention recently because of their ability to collect particulate and organic emissions from combustion sources (Huisingh et al., 1978; Lewtas, in press). One method of sampling, represented by the Source Assessment Sampling System (SASS), is designed to collect and size-classify particulate and to collect nonparticulate organic and inorganic materials at source conditions. The second method, represented by various types of dilution tunnel, is designed to collect total particulate and particulate-bound organic material at conditions which approximate ambient environment.

Keywords

Combustion Source Fiberglass Filter Reverse Mutation Assay Organic Emission Dilution Tunnel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Blake, D. 1978. Source Assessment Sampling System: Design and Development. EPA-600/7–78–018. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Research Triangle Park, NC.Google Scholar
  2. Dorsey, J.A., L.D. Johnson, and R.G. Merrill. 1978. A Phased Approach for Characterization of Multimedia Discharges from Processes. ACS Symposium Series No. 94. American Chemical Society: Washington, DC. pp. 29–48.Google Scholar
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  5. Lewtas, J. (in press). Comparison of the mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic activity of particle bound organics from wood stoves, residential oil furnaces, and other combustion sources. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Residential Solid Fuels, Portland, OR, 1981.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond G. MerrillJr.
    • 1
  • Joellen Lewtas
    • 2
  • Robert E. Hall
    • 1
  1. 1.Industrial Environmental Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  2. 2.Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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