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On the use of Relative Toxicity for Risk Estimation

  • C. S. Dudney
  • P. J. Walsh
  • T. D. Jones
  • E. E. Calle
  • G. D. Griffin
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 27)

Abstract

Risk assessment may be viewed as the integration of comprehensive health and environmental studies for the estimation of human health risk. There is increasing impetus to use risk assessment to set priorities for research needs in health and environmental areas as well as to provide the best quantification of risk based on available data. Any general risk assessment methodology includes two components: measurement or estimation of exposure, and estimation of exposure-response relationships. These two components are usually called exposure assessment and health effects assessment.

Keywords

Relative Potency Test Chemical Coke Oven Relative Toxicity Reference Chemical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. S. Dudney
    • 1
  • P. J. Walsh
    • 1
  • T. D. Jones
    • 1
  • E. E. Calle
    • 1
  • G. D. Griffin
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Effects and Epidemiology Group, Health Studies Section, Health and Safety Research DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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