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Fractionation of an Oil Shale Retort Process Water: Isolation of Photoactive Genotoxic Components

  • Gary F. Strniste
  • Judy M. Bingham
  • W. Dale Spall
  • Joyce W. Nickols
  • Richard T. Okinaka
  • David J.-C. Chen
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  • 79 Downloads
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 27)

Abstract

We have previously shown that near ultraviolet light (NUV) and natural sunlight activate a variety of complex mixtures (products and waste streams from the retorting of oil shale), inducing genotoxic responses in cultured mammalian cells (Strniste and Brake, 1980; Strniste and Chen, 1981; Strniste et al., 1981; Chen and Strniste, 1982; Strniste et al., 1982a,b). In this report we present recent data concerning our attempts to fractionate and to chemically identify photoactive, genotoxic components in a particularly bioactive oil shale retort process water. Liquid-liquid extraction methods and reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) were employed in the fractionation scheme, and individual samples were assessed for potential photoinduced toxicity and mutagenicity in cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. For comparison, these fractionated water samples were also assessed for mutagenic potential using the Salmonella histidine reversion assay with microsomal activation (Ames et al., 1975). The photoactive fractions of the process water have been analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to define their chemical composition.

Keywords

High Pressure Liquid Chromatography Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Chinese Hamster Ovary Mutagenic Activity Process Water 
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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary F. Strniste
    • 1
  • Judy M. Bingham
    • 1
  • W. Dale Spall
    • 2
  • Joyce W. Nickols
    • 1
  • Richard T. Okinaka
    • 1
  • David J.-C. Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Life Sciences Division, Los Alamos National LaboratoryGenetics GroupsLos AlamosUSA
  2. 2.Life Sciences Division, Los Alamos National LaboratoryToxicology GroupsLos AlamosUSA

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