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Historical Roots of the Legal Control of Police Behavior

  • Samuel Walker
Chapter

Abstract

In the spring of 1956 a member of the American Bar Foundation research team asked a Wisconsin police chief what he thought about the exclusionary rule. “Oh, we never exclude anyone from the court room,” the chief assured him.1

Keywords

Domestic Violence Police Officer Police Department Police Behavior Historical Root 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Walker

There are no affiliations available

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