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Community Policing and the Rule of Law

  • Stephen D. Mastrofski
  • Jack R. Greene
Chapter

Abstract

Over the course of American history, much has been made of the distinction between “government by laws” and “government by men.” Different times and circumstances have evoked calls for more of one and less of the other, to rectify what reformers perceived as the faults of the current imbalance between the two. When government seems too corrupt, inefficient, or unequal in its treatment of the governed, stronger laws and more rules and regulations are called for. When government seems too unresponsive, inflexible, and ineffective, the call is to lighten the burden of rigid laws and allow citizens to govern themselves as exigencies dictate.

Keywords

Police Department Citizen Participation Police Organization Community Police Police Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen D. Mastrofski
  • Jack R. Greene

There are no affiliations available

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