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Pesticides in air: Sampling methods

  • Louis P. van Dyk
  • Krischnamurthy Visweswariah
Conference paper
Part of the Residue Reviews book series (RECT, volume 55)

Abstract

The presence of pesticides1 in air has concerned various research groups during the past decade. Some environmental pollution scientists claim that as much as one-half of some pesticides applied in the field eventually ends up in the air (Westlake and Gunther 1966, Lloyd-Jones 1971). The atmosphere may thus be the major route by which pesticides are spread around the world (Cohen and Pinkerton 1966, Delany et al. 1967, Risebrough et al. 1968, Frost 1969, Barrows et al. 1969, Seba and Prospero 1971, Truhaut 1971, Woodwell et al. 1971). Losses to the atmosphere are largely inadvertent and may occur during application by drift (van Middelem 1966), volatilization (Lloyd-Jones 1971), or wind erosion (Pionke and Chesters 1973). Volatilization of pesticides from soil depends primarily upon soil temperature, soil moisture content, air movement, and relative humidity of the surrounding air (Gückel et al. 1973, Pionke and Chesters 1973, Spencer and Cliath 1973). Differential potential rates of loss to the atmosphere thus depend on prevailing weather conditions in different climatic zones.

Keywords

Collection Efficiency Methyl Parathion Centrifugal Compressor Health Aspect Heptachlor Epoxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis P. van Dyk
    • 1
  • Krischnamurthy Visweswariah
    • 2
  1. 1.Plant Protection Research InstitutePretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.Central Food Technological Research InstituteMysoreIndia

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