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Indoor Radon

  • Maurice A. Rabkin
  • David Bodansky
Chapter
  • 124 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology book series (ANST, volume 20)

Abstract

The first awareness of radon as a health hazard came from observations of increased lung cancer incidence among uranium and other miners. During the past decade there has been increasing recognition of the importance of radon in the indoor environment as well. Extrapolations from radon exposures in mines to those in homes indicate that radon will cause a significant number of lung cancer deaths among the general population if its effects are linearly proportional to the magnitude of the exposure. For example, in the United States roughly 5 000 to 20 000 lung cancer deaths per year are now attributed to indoor radon. (1) Consistent with this, the effective dose equivalent from indoor radon is larger than the dose from any other radiation source for most people in temperate climates.

Keywords

Radon Concentration Linear Energy Transfer Indoor Radon Radon Level Radon Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maurice A. Rabkin
    • 1
  • David Bodansky
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Health and Nuclear EngineeringUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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