Advertisement

Environmentally Sound Supply Chain Management

Implementation in the computer industry
  • Sara Beckman
  • Janet Bercovitz
  • Christine Rosen
Chapter

Abstract

Traditional approaches to environmental management have focused on individual production units within the firm, and have attempted to minimize energy consumed and waste produced by each unit as a separate entity.1Increasingly, however, companies are adhering to the philosophy expounded by industrial ecologists and implementing plans to minimize energy consumption and waste throughout the entire life cycle of a manufactured good - from extraction of virgin materials, through processing of raw materials and energy, to parts fabrication and product assembly, and finally through the use and ultimate disposal of the product. (See, for example, O’Rourke, Connelly, and Koshland (1996), Tibbs (1991), Tibbs (1992), Lowe (1993), Richards et. al. (1994), Ayres (1993), Ehrenfeld (1994).)

Keywords

Supply Chain Environmental Performance Supply Chain Management International Standard Organization Environmental Management System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference

  1. Ayres, Robert U., “Industrial Metabolism: Theory and Policy,” in Braden R. Allenby and Deanna J. Richards, The Greening of Industrial Ecosystems (Washington, D.C., 1994), 23–27.Google Scholar
  2. Barney, Jay B. 1991. “Firm Resources and Sustained Competitive Advantage,” Journal of Management, 17(1): 99–120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bast, Cliff, “Hewlett-Packard’s Approach to Creating a Life Cycle (Product Stewardship) Program,” Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Electronics and the Environment (San Francisco, May 1994).Google Scholar
  4. Beckman, Sara L., “Evolution of Management Roles in a Networked Organization: An Insider’s View of the Hewlett-Packard Company,”_Broken Ladders: Managerial Careers in the New Economy, ed. Paul Osterman, Oxford University Press, 1996.Google Scholar
  5. Bhate, S. and K. Lawler, “Environmentally friendly products: Factors that influence their adoption,” Technovation (August 1997), Vol. 17, No. 8, 457–465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Brinkley, Anne and Tim Mann, “Documenting Product Environmental Attributes,” Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Electronics and the Environment (San Francisco, May, 1997).Google Scholar
  7. Choong, Hsia, “Procurement of Environmentally Responsible Material,” Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on Electronics and the Environment (Dallas, May 1996).Google Scholar
  8. Ehrenfeld, John R., “Industrial Ecology: A Strategic Framework for Product Policy and Other Sustainable Practices,” paper prepared for Green Goods: The Second International Conference and Workshop on Product Oriented Policy (Stockholm, 1994).Google Scholar
  9. Environment Watch: Western Europe, “Draft ISO Standard 14020 on General Principles for All Environmental Labels and Declarations,” (5 April 1996): 2.Google Scholar
  10. Fay, W., “The Environment’s Second Wave,” Marketing Research: A Magazine of Management and Applications (December 1992), Vol. 4, No. 4, pp. 44–45.Google Scholar
  11. Fenn, Scott A., “Green Heat,” 98 Technology Review, (July 1995): 62–63.Google Scholar
  12. Gottlieb, Robert and Maureen Smith, The Pollution Control System: Themes and Frameworks,” in Robert Gottlieb (ed.), Reducing Toxics: A New Approach to Policy and Industrial Decision Making (Washington, D.C. and Covelo, Ca: Island Press, 1995).Google Scholar
  13. Gottlieb, Robert, Maureen Smith, and Julie Roque, “By Air, Water, and Land: The Media Specific Approach to Toxics Policies,” in Robert Gottlieb (ed.), Reducing Toxics: A New Approach to Policy and Industrial Decision Making (Washington, D.C. and Covelo, Ca.: Island Press, 1995).Google Scholar
  14. Kulik, Ann, “Producers to be Held Accountable for Product Waste,” World Wastes (November 1994) 37(11): 10–14.Google Scholar
  15. Lowe, Ernest, “Industrial Ecology – An Organizing Framework for Environmental Management,” Total Quality Environmental Management (Autumn 1993): 73–85.Google Scholar
  16. Janice Mazurek, Robert Gottlieb, and Julie Roque, “Shifting to Prevention: The Limits of Current Policy,” in Robert Gottlieb (ed.), Reducing Toxics: A New Approach to Policy and Industrial Decision Making (Washington, D.C. and Covelo, Ca: Island Press, 1995).Google Scholar
  17. Miller, C, “Conflicting Studies Still Have Execs Wondering What Data to Believe,” Marketing News (June 7,1993), Vol. 27, No. 12,1–12.Google Scholar
  18. O’Rourke, Dara, Lloyd Connelly, and Catherine P. Koshland, “Industrial Ecology: A Critical Review,” (University of California Berkeley, March 7,1996).Google Scholar
  19. Richards, Deanna J., Braden R. Allenby and Robert A. Frosch. 1994. “The Greening of Industrial Ecosystems: Overview and Perspectives,” in Braden R. Allenby and Deanna J. Richards, The Greening of Industrial Ecosystems (Washington, D.C., 1994).Google Scholar
  20. Tibbs, Hardin, “Industrial Ecology: An Environmental Agenda for Industry” (1991) Arthur D. Little, Inc.Google Scholar
  21. Tibbs, Hardin, “Industrial Ecology: An Agenda for Environmental Management,” Pollution Prevention Review (Spring 1992): 167–180.Google Scholar
  22. Wu, Tse-sung, Paul lWorhach and Paul Sheng, “The Role of Environmental Specifications in the Electronics Product Development Cycle,” Working Paper of the Consortium on Green Design and Manufacturing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California Berkeley, 1998.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara Beckman
    • 1
  • Janet Bercovitz
    • 2
  • Christine Rosen
    • 1
  1. 1.Haas School of BusinessUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.The Fuqua School of BusinessDuke UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations