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Reactor Fuel Management and Energy Cost Considerations

  • Samuel Glasstone
  • Alexander Sesonske
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  • 739 Downloads

Abstract

Reactor fuel management is concerned with those activities involved in the planning for and design of the fuel loading for a nuclear power plant. Planning activities include fuel procurement over a period of years as required for future reload batches and consideration of utility operational strategy that may affect the energy production of the given generating unit. Fuel loading design requires not only the development of specifications for a new fuel batch, but also the determination of the core location for fuel assemblies from previous batches which will be reinserted. The nature of these activities will become clearer to the reader as the relevant topics are presented.

Keywords

Fuel Assembly Uranium Hexafluoride Fuel Management Breeding Ratio Fresh Fuel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Glasstone
  • Alexander Sesonske

There are no affiliations available

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