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The Nucleus pp 303-314 | Cite as

Projectile Fragmentation Studies with the Most Exotic Nuclei

  • David J. Morrissey
Chapter
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Abstract

The Al200 projectile fragment separator has been operated at the NSCL for more than seven years. This device has delivered exotic nuclei from the fragmentation of a large variety of projectiles that extends out to the limits of stability. The complexity of the measurements with the most exotic nuclei has evolved during this period from simple identification and decay studies to sophisticated studies of secondary nuclear reactions. Recent examples that will be presented include the coulomb excitation of neutron-rich nuclei in the sulfur-argon region with comparative studies of the (p,p’) reaction with the same nuclei and a study of the (d,n) reaction of 7Be to form the ground state of 8B performed in inverse kinematics as a prototype for studying direct reactions. The results of all of these reactions were compared with a number of DWBA analyses and indicate the need for more theoretical work. The Al200 will be de-commissioned in July, 1999 and will be replaced with a new device with a much larger acceptance and higher resolution. The progress of the up-grade project is also very briefly summarized.

Keywords

Exotic Nucleus Secondary Beam Coulomb Excitation Fragment Separator Optical Model Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Morrissey
    • 1
  1. 1.National Superconducting Cyclotron LaboratoryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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