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Drug Use and Abuse

  • Steven M. Mirin
  • Roger D. Weiss
Chapter
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Estimates of the prevalence of narcotic addiction vary considerably but probably include 0.3% of the population, or about 600,000 heroin addicts. They present to the emergency room for the following reasons: serious medical problems resulting from overdose or intoxication, medical complications of their addictions, and/or withdrawal symptoms and signs resulting in drug-seeking behavior.

Keywords

Physical Dependence Heroin Addict Opiate Withdrawal Chronic User Central Nervous System Depressant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven M. Mirin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Roger D. Weiss
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Westwood Lodge HospitalWestwoodUSA
  3. 3.McLean HospitalBelmontUSA

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