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Models

  • J. Mark Davis
  • Henry E. Adams
Chapter

Abstract

Sarah is a 32-year-old mother of two small children, a girl age 4 and a boy age 2. She has been married for 11 years to a man she met in college. Sarah earned a bachelor’s degree in architecture and had a successful and exciting career before deciding to take several years off to raise a family. Her husband is a partner in a new sporting goods store and has little time to spend at home. Throughout college, Sarah had periodic bouts of feeling “down in the dumps,” during which she had to drag herself to class and did not want to be around her family and friends. The feelings only lasted for several days, and she attributed the spells to stress. Her current problems seem to have begun during her pregnancy. On several occasions, unexpectedly, her heart began to race, she became short of breath, she felt dizzy and nauseous, and it seemed as if the room was spinning and she might faint. The episodes lasted a few minutes but were terrifying. At the time, she thought they were probably due to the pregnancy and did not tell anyone. Some time after her daughter was born, she had two similar experiences of panic. One time she was in the supermarket and had to leave the store hurriedly and sit in her car until she calmed down. The other time, she was driving down a fairly busy neighborhood street with her child in the front seat and had to pull over quickly until she could get herself back together.

Keywords

Medical Model Clinical Psychologist Abnormal Behavior Social Learning Theory Theoretical Orientation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Mark Davis
    • 1
  • Henry E. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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