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Intellectual Evaluation

  • Robert L. Hale
  • Elizabeth A. Green
Chapter

Abstract

If Adam and Eve were not the first evaluators of intelligence, who were? Did they compare their sons and believe one more intelligent than the other? Perhaps Adam thought Cain was the most intelligent, while Eve knew Abel was the brighter. If so, both may have been correct depending on their personal definitions of intelligence. What do we mean when we say a person is more or less intelligent? Today the concept of intelligence has both lay and professional meanings. We must define what intelligence is before we can discuss it.

Keywords

Intelligence Scale Intelligence Test Mental Ability Achievement Score Psychological Corporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Hale
    • 1
  • Elizabeth A. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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