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Personality Assessment

  • Yossef S. Ben-Porath
  • James N. Butcher
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  • 155 Downloads

Abstract

Administration and interpretation of psychological tests are hallmarks of the clinical psychologist. Whereas other mental health professionals, along with the clinical psychologist, develop an expertise in interviewing and treatment, psychological testing represents a clinical skill that is unique to the psychologist. In this chapter, we focus on use of psychological tests in the objective assessment of personality.

Keywords

Personality Assessment Computerize Adaptive Testing Validity Scale Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Objective Personality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yossef S. Ben-Porath
    • 1
  • James N. Butcher
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyKent State UniversityKentUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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