Advertisement

Behavioral Methods

  • Eileen D. Gambrill
Chapter
  • 145 Downloads

Abstract

Behavioral methods entered the stage of clinical psychology in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Various names for this approach include behavior therapy and behavior modification. The essence of behavioral intervention is providing new learning experiences that will help to resolve problems. Behavioral methods have been applied to a wide variety of problems (see for example, the International Handbook of Behavior Modification and Behavior Therapy [Bellack, Hersen, & Kazdin, 1990]). (See Table 8-1.) They offer a richness of approaches to problems at many different levels. For example, there is an extensive literature on the use of behavioral methods in communities and organizations as well as with individuals, families, and groups.

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Behavior Analysis Apply Behavior Analysis Social Skill Training Behavior Analyst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baer, D.M. (1982). Applied behavior analysis. In G. T. Wilson & C. M. Franks (Eds.), Contemporary behavior therapy: Conceptual and empirical foundations (pp. 277–309). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  2. Baer, D. M. (1991). Tacting “to a fault.” Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 24, 429–432.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Baer, D. M., Wolf, M. M., & Risley, T. R. (1968). Some current dimensions of applied behavior analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1, 91–97.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Baer, D. M., Wolf, M. M., & Risley, T. R. (1987). Some still current dimensions of applied behavior analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 20, 313–327.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  6. Beck, A. T., & Emery, G. (1985). Anxiety disorders and phobias: A cognitive perspective. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  7. Beck, A. T., & Weishaar, M. E. (1989). Cognitive therapy. In R. J. Corsini & D. Wedding (Eds.), Current psychotherapies (4th ed.). Itasca, IL: Peacock.Google Scholar
  8. Bellack, A. S., Hersen, M., & Kazdin, A. E. (Eds.). (1990). International handbook of behavior modification and therapy (2nd ed.). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  9. Bergan, J. R., & Kratochwill, T. R. (1990). Behavioral consultation and therapy. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  10. Christian, W. P., Hannah, G. T., & Glahn, T. J. (1984). Programming effective human services: Strategies for institutional change and client transition. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Cooper, J. O., Heron, T. E., & Heward, W. L. (1987). Applied behavior analysis. Columbus: Merrill.Google Scholar
  12. Ellis, A. (1993). Rational-emotive therapy. In R. J. Corsini & D. Wedding (Eds.), Current psycho-therapies (4th ed.). Itasca, IL: Peacock.Google Scholar
  13. Favell, J. E., & McGimsey, J. F. (1993). Defining an acceptable treatment environment. In R. Van Houten & S. Axelrod (Eds.). Behavior analysis and treatment (pp. 25–45). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Fawcett, S. B. (1991). Some values guiding community research and action. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 24, 621–636.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Franks, C. M., Wilson, G. T., Kendall, P. C., & Foreyt, J. P. (1990). Review of behavior therapy, theory and practice (Vol. 12). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  16. Gilbert, P. (1989). Human nature and suffering. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  17. Goldstein, R. S., & Baer, D. M. (1976). R.S.V.R: A procedure to increase the personal mail and number of correspondents for nursing home residents. Behavior Therapy, 7, 348–354.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hart, B. M., Reynolds, N. J., Baer, D. M., Brawley, E. R., & Harris, F. R. (1968). Effect of contingent and non-contingent social reinforcement on the cooperative play of a preschool child. Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis, 1, 73–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hawton, K., Salkovskis, P. M., Kirk, J., & Clark, D. M. (Eds.). (1991). Cognitive behavior therapy for psychiatric problems: A practical guide. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Hayes, S. C. (1989). Rule governed behavior: Cognition, contingencies and instructional control. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  21. Ingram, R. E., & Scott, W. D. (1992). Cognitive behavior therapy. In A. S. Bellack, M. Hersen, & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), International handbook of behavior modification and therapy (2nd ed.). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  22. Kanfer, F. H., & Goldstein, A. P. (Eds.). (1991). Helping people change: A textbook of methods (4th ed.). New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  23. Kendall, P. C., & Braswell, L. (1985). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for impulsive children. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  24. Kirk, S., & Kutchins, H. (1992). The selling of DSM: The rhetoric of science in psychiatry. New York: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  25. L’Abate, L., & Milan, M. A. (1985). Handbook of social skills training and research. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  26. LeCroy, C. W. (Ed.). (1994). Handbook of child and adolescent treatment manuals. New York: Lexington.Google Scholar
  27. Liberman, R. P., DeRisi, W. J., & Mueser, K. T. (1989). Social skills training for psychiatric patients. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  28. Malott, R. W., Whaley, D. L., & Malott, E. (1993). Elementary principles of behavior (2nd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  29. Martin, G., & Pear, J. (1988). Behavior modification: What it is and how to do it (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  30. Meichenbaum, D. (1977). Cognitive behavior modification: An integrative approach. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  31. Meyer, L. H., & Evans, I. M. (1989). Nonaversive intervention for behavior problems. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  32. Moore, J. (1990). On mentalism, privacy and behaviorism. Journal of Mind and Behavior, 11, 19–36.Google Scholar
  33. Nezu, A. M., Nezu, C. M., & Perri, M. G. (1989). Problem-solving therapy for depression. New York: Wiley,.Google Scholar
  34. Park, H. S., & Gaylord-Ross, R. (1989). A problem-solving approach to social skills training in employment settings with mentally retarded youth. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 22, 373–380.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Paul, G. L. (Ed.). (1986). Assessment in residential treatment settings: Principles and methods to support cost-effective quality operations. Champaign, IL: Research Press.Google Scholar
  36. Pinkston, E. M., & Linsk, N. L. (1984). Care of the elderly: A family approach. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  37. Pryor, K. (1984). Don’t shoot the dog! The new art of teaching and training. New York: Bantam Books.Google Scholar
  38. Redmon, W. K., & Dickinson, A. M. (1990). Promoting excellence through performance management. New York: Haworth.Google Scholar
  39. Rose, S. D., & Edleson, J. L. (1987). Working with children and adolescents in groups. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  40. Scholing, A., & Emmelkamp, P. M. G. (1990). Social phobia: Nature and treatment. In H. Leitenberg (Ed.), Handbook of social and evaluative anxiety. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  41. Sidman, M. (1989). Coercion and its fallout. Boston: Authors Cooperative Inc.Google Scholar
  42. Skinner, B. F. (1974). About behaviorism. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  43. Skinner, B. F. (1988). The operant side of behavior therapy. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 19, 171–179.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Sloane, R. B., Staples, F. R., Cristol, A. H., Yorkston, J. J., & Whipple, K. (1975). Psychotherapy versus behavior therapy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Snyder, M., & Thomsen, C. J. (1988). Interactions between therapists and clients: Hypothesis testing and behavioral confirmation. In D. C. Turk & P. Salovey (Eds.), Reasoning, inference, and judgment in clinical psychology (pp. 124–152). New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  46. Sulzer-Azaroff, B., & Mayer, G. R. (1991). Behavior analysis for lasting change. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
  47. Todd, J. T., & Morris, E. K. (1983). Misconception and miseducation: Presentations of radical behaviorism in psychology textbooks. The Behavior Analyst, 6, 153–160.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  48. Truax, C. (1966). Reinforcement and nonreinforcement in Rogerian psychotherapy. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 71, 1–9.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Watson, D. L., & Tharp, R. G. (1989). Self-directed behavior: Self-modification for personal adjustment (5th ed.). Monterey, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  50. Wills, T. A. (1982). Nonspecific factors in helping relationships. In T. A. Wills (Ed.), Basic processes in helping relationships. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  51. Wolpe, J. (1958). Psychotherapy by reciprocal inhibitions. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  52. Wolpe, J. (1989). The derailment of behavior therapy: A tale of conceptual misdirection. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 20, 3–15.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Wolpe, J. (1990). The practice of behavior therapy. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  54. Wyatt, W. J. (1990). Radical behaviorism misrepresented: A response to Mahoney. American Psychologist, 45, 1181–1184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eileen D. Gambrill
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WelfareUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

Personalised recommendations