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Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

  • Stephen F. Butler
  • Herbert Demmin
  • Hans H. Strupp
Chapter
  • 149 Downloads

Abstract

The inception of psychoanalytic theory and practice was in December of 1880. Prior to that time, no true form of psychotherapy as we think of it today was in existence, and there was much confusion about the nature of the so-called mental disorders. Did all the bizarre symptoms that were observed have organic bases? How could a person’s psychology or psychological problems lead to symptoms? There were indications at the time that some symptoms, even physical symptoms like paralysis, were not the result of physical disability. The famous French physician Charcot was busy demonstrating that dramatic, if short-lived, cures of physical disabilities such as blindness and paralysis could be obtained through hypnosis. Were these people really sick? If so, what had gone wrong with them, and what could be done to help them? The practice of what we now recognize as psychotherapy (all forms of psychotherapy) began with the treatment of one particularly disturbed and particularly talented young woman who began treatment in December of 1880 with Josef Breuer, a respected Viennese physician.

Keywords

Object Relation Borderline Personality Disorder Psychoanalytic Theory Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Romantic Involvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen F. Butler
    • 1
  • Herbert Demmin
    • 2
  • Hans H. Strupp
    • 3
  1. 1.Innovative Training SystemsAmherstUSA
  2. 2.Brookside HospitalNashuaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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