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Intelligent Mobility Aids for the Elderly

  • Glenn Wasson
  • Pradip Sheth
  • Cunjun Huang
  • Majd Alwan
Chapter
Part of the Aging Medicine book series (AGME)

Keywords

Obstacle Avoidance Stability Index Stability Margin Motion Capture System Active Guidance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glenn Wasson
    • 1
  • Pradip Sheth
  • Cunjun Huang
  • Majd Alwan
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer ScienceUniversity of Virginia

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