Advertisement

Energy and Cogeneration

  • I. Pilatowsky
  • R.J. Romero
  • C.A. Isaza
  • S.A. Gamboa
  • P.J. Sebastian
  • W. Rivera
Chapter
  • 1.1k Downloads
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

The word energy is derived from the Greek in (in) and ergon (work). The accepted scientific energy concept has been used to reveal the common characteristics in diverse processes where a particular type of work is produced. At the most basic level, the diversity in energy forms can be limited to four: kinetics, gravitational, electric, and nuclear.

Energy is susceptible to being transformed from one form to another, where the total quantity of energy remains unchanged; it is known that: “Energy can neither be created nor destroyed, only transformed”. This principle is known as the first law of thermodynamics, which establishes an energy balance in the different transformation processes.

When the energy changes from one form to another, the energy obtained at the end of the process will never be larger than the energy used at the beginning, there will always be a defined quantity of energy that could not be transformed.

Keywords

Fuel Cell Gross Domestic Product Steam Turbine Waste Heat Carbon Dioxide Emission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bretton DJ (1997) Cogeneration in the new deregulated energy environment. Thesis, Georgia Institute of TechnologyGoogle Scholar
  2. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings: http://www.bchp.org/owner-basic.html. Accessed 30 Dec 2008Google Scholar
  3. Dyer DF, Maples G (1991) Boiler efficiency improvement. Boiler Efficiency Institute, AuburnGoogle Scholar
  4. Hardy JD (2003) A cooling, heating, and power for buildings (CHP-b). Thesis Mississippi State UniversityGoogle Scholar
  5. International Energy Agency (2006) World energy outlook. www.iea.orgGoogle Scholar
  6. International Energy Annual (2006) International Energy Agency, long-term historical international energy statisticsGoogle Scholar
  7. Onsite Sycom (1999) Review of CHP technologies. US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable EnergyGoogle Scholar
  8. Rosen MA (1990) Comparison based on energy and exergy analyses of the potential cogeneration efficiencies for fuel cells and other electricity generation devices. Int J Hydrogen Energy 15(4):267–274CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Shah RK (1997) Recuperators, regenerators and compact heat exchangers. CRC Handbook of Energy Efficiency. CRC Press, New York http://www.chpcentermw.org/presentations/WI-Focus-on-Energy-Presentation-05212003.pdf. Accessed 30 Dec 2008Google Scholar
  10. United Nations (2008) World economic situation and prospectsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Pilatowsky
    • 1
  • R.J. Romero
    • 2
  • C.A. Isaza
    • 3
  • S.A. Gamboa
    • 1
  • P.J. Sebastian
    • 1
  • W. Rivera
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Investigación en EnergíaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoTemixcoMexico
  2. 2.Centro de Investigación en Ingeniería y Ciencias AplicadasUniversidad Autónoma del Estado de MorelosCuernavacaMexico
  3. 3.Instituto de Energía, Materiales y Medio Ambiente, Grupo de Energía y TermodinámicaUniversidad Pontificia BolivarianaMedellínColombia

Personalised recommendations