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Risk Assessment in Oral Cancer

  • Saman WarnakulasuriyaEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

Susceptibility to oral cancer is largely related to one’s lifestyle. Environmental and lifestyle exposure to carcinogens place some people at increased risk of developing oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer. A patient diagnosed with a potentially malignant disorder is logically at higher risk, particularly if the lesion exhibits epithelial dysplasia. Evidence-based strategies are available to reduce risks over time. Knowledge of risk factors and accurate detection of high-risk mucosal lesions provide opportunities for risk assessment in primary care, enabling the practitioner to discuss care pathways. It is important to develop prediction models and novel biomarkers to refine risk assessment and contribute to improved clinical outcomes.

Notes

Acknowledgement

I wish to thank Dr Luis de Silva Monteiro for help drawing Fig. 1.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King’s College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral CancerLondonUK

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