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Optimal Trajectory Planning for a Single Train

  • Yihui WangEmail author
  • Bin Ning
  • Ton van den Boom
  • Bart De Schutter
Chapter
  • 781 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Industrial Control book series (AIC)

Abstract

In this chapter, the optimal trajectory planning problem for the operation of a single train under various constraints and with a fixed arrival time is considered. The objective function corresponds to a trade-off between the energy consumption and the riding comfort . Two approaches are proposed to solve this optimal control problem, viz. a pseudospectral method and a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) approach. In the pseudospectral method, the optimal trajectory planning problem is recast into a multiple-phase optimal control problem, which is then transformed into a nonlinear programming problem. For the MILP approach, the optimal trajectory planning problem is reformulated as an MILP problem by approximating the nonlinear terms by piecewise affine functions. The performance of these two approaches is compared through a case study. The work discussed in this chapter is based on Wang et al. (Proceedings of the 14th international IEEE conference on intelligent transportation systems (ITSC 2011). Washington DC, USA, pp 1598–1604, 2011) [1]; Wang et al. (Transp Res Part C 29:97–114, 2013) [2]; Wang et al. (Proceedings of the 13th IFAC symposium on control in transportation systems (CTS’2012). Sofia, Bulgaria, pp 158–163, 2012) [3].

Keywords

Optimal Control Problem Mixed Integer Linear Programming Pseudospectral Method Space Interval Path Constraint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yihui Wang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Bin Ning
    • 1
  • Ton van den Boom
    • 2
  • Bart De Schutter
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Rail Traffic Control and SafetyBeijing Jiaotong UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.Delft Center for Systems and ControlDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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