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Hologram Simulation of Aluminum Reduction Cells

  • Naijun Zhou
Chapter
  • 792 Downloads

Abstract

The “hologram simulation” concept is put forward to replace the traditional “Three-fields” (including magnetic field, thermal field and force field) notion in simulating aluminum reduction cells. The core of the hologram simulation is to simulate microstructures of the cells’ parameters distribution under various structural and operating conditions. In hologram simulation, the effect of various input information can no longer be treated as single or independent variables, because of the interacting they have with each other. The hologram simulation approach can be used for both static and dynamic analysis of the cells, and it as more suitable to describe the detail working of the cells. In this chapter, the models for several main physical fields including the current field, magnetic field, thermal field, and the molten metal flow field are respectively discussed; moreover, the dynamic simulation method and several calculation models of the current efficiency for aluminum reduction cells also are introduced.

Keywords

Current Efficiency Electromagnetic Force Light Metal Molten Aluminum Aluminum Electrolysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Metallurgical Industry Press, Beijing and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naijun Zhou
    • 1
  1. 1.Central South UniversityChina

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