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Interactive Displays and Next-Generation Interfaces

  • Michael Haller
  • Peter Brandl
  • Christoph Richter
  • Jakob Leitner
  • Thomas Seifried
  • Adam Gokcezade
  • Daniel Leithinger
Chapter

Abstract

Until recently, the limitations of display and interface technologies have restricted the potential for human interaction and collaboration with computers. For example, desktop computer style interfaces have not translated well to mobile devices and static display technologies tend to leave the user one step removed from interacting with content. However, the emergence of interactive whiteboards has pointed to new possibilities for using display technology for interaction and collaboration. A range of emerging technologies and applications could enable more natural and human centred interfaces so that interacting with computers and content becomes more intuitive. This will be important as computing moves from the desktop to be embedded in objects, devices and locations around us and as our desktop and data are no longer device dependent but follow us across multiple platforms and locations.

Keywords

Input Device Interactive Table Interactive Display Tabletop Display Interactive Workspace 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Haller
    • 1
  • Peter Brandl
    • 1
  • Christoph Richter
    • 2
  • Jakob Leitner
    • 1
  • Thomas Seifried
    • 1
  • Adam Gokcezade
    • 1
  • Daniel Leithinger
    • 3
  1. 1.Media Interaction LabUpper Austria University of Applied SciencesHagenbergAustria
  2. 2.Research Group Knowledge MediaUpper Austria University of Applied SciencesHagenbergAustria
  3. 3.Media LabMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)CambridgeUSA

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