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Ozone Formation, Destruction and Exposure in Europe and the United States

  • W. R. Stockwell
  • G. Kramm
  • H.-E. Scheel
  • V. A. Mohnen
  • W. Seiler
Chapter
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 127)

Abstract

One of the earliest observations that air pollution could damage vegetation was made in Los Angeles during 1944 (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts 1986). It was established by Middleton et al. (1950) that plant damage was associated with air pollution episodes. Haagen-Smit et al. (1952) showed that similar plant damage could be caused by synthetic mixtures of alkenes and 03 or by mixtures of nitrogen dioxide and alkenes that had been exposed to light. In subsequent research, Haagen-Smit and coworkers (Haagen-Smit 1952; Haagen-Smit et al. 1953; Haagen-Smit and Fox 1956) showed that photochemical reactions of nitrogen oxides and organic compounds produced 03 and other pollutants.

Keywords

Ozone Concentration Tropospheric Ozone Surface Ozone Ozone Formation Free Troposphere 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. R. Stockwell
  • G. Kramm
  • H.-E. Scheel
  • V. A. Mohnen
  • W. Seiler

There are no affiliations available

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