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Controlled O3 Exposures and Field Observations of O3 Effects in the UK

  • A. R. Wellburn
  • J. D. Barnes
  • P. W. Lucas
  • A. R. Mcleod
  • T. A. Mansfield
Chapter
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 127)

Abstract

Damage caused by air pollution to conifers in the UK was first recorded by Cohen and Ruston (1912), and it has long been known that one of the most serious effects of air pollution on conifers is increased susceptibility to cold injury and drought (Munch 1933; Lux 1965) including winter desiccation. Consequently, studies of the effects of atmospheric O3 on tree health using controlled O3 exposures in the UK have been directed towards evaluating these relationships. The O3 pollution climate of the UK and several surveys of tree health are discussed along with the results of long-term exposures including data obtained from the large-scale fumigation experiment at Liphook. Detailed results from UK chamber studies of O3-induced changes in surface waxes, winter hardening, nutrient leaching, photosynthesis, carbon allocation and responses to biotic factors in conifers are followed by a description of the studies of the effects of interactions of drought with atmospheric O3 on deciduous trees.

Keywords

Plant Cell Environ Forest Decline Winter Hardiness Soil Moisture Deficit Forestry Commission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. Wellburn
  • J. D. Barnes
  • P. W. Lucas
  • A. R. Mcleod
  • T. A. Mansfield

There are no affiliations available

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