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Studies on Transformation by the Adenovirus-SV40 Hybrid Viruses

  • Paul H. Black
  • Howard Igel
Chapter
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research / Fortschritte der Krebsforschung / Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 6)

Abstract

The adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses have been utilized for in vitro transformation experiments in order to answer the following questions:
  1. 1)

    Do all hybrids have the ability to transform primary weanling hamster kidney tissue culture cells?

     
  2. 2)

    What contribution to the transformation does the SV40 genome make, and would the effect on differentiation of hamster kidney cells observed with SV40 virus be seen by the hybrid viruses which contain only a portion of the SV40 genome?

     
  3. 3)

    What other markers of the SV40 genome are present in transformed cells other than the SV40 tumor (T) antigen?

     
  4. 4)

    Can a non-oncogenic adenovirus become oncogenic by the presence of a portion of the SV40 genome integrated with the adenovirus DNA?

     
  5. 5)

    Can enhancement of the oncogenic potential of an adenovirus be effected by the integration of a part of the SV40 genome?

     
  6. 6)

    If non-oncogenic adenoviruses, by hybridization, become oncogenic, would the tumors have a T antigen charactetristic of the non-oncogenic adenovirus?

     
  7. 7)

    What contributions to the transformation do the adeno and SV40 genomes make as regards morphology of the transformed cells?

     

Keywords

Complement Fixation Oncogenic Potential Hybrid Particle African Green Monkey Kidney African Green Monkey Kidney Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul H. Black
    • 1
  • Howard Igel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Cancer Institute, Carcinogenesis Studies BranchNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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