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The Effect of Preparation Conditions on the Rheological Properties of Gomatofu (Sesame Tofu)

  • Emiko SatoEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Soft and Biological Matter book series (SOBIMA)

Abstract

Gomatofu, a mixed gel consisting of kudzu starch and sesame seed, possesses unique textural characteristics. That is the Japanese traditional, healthy, and vegetarian food. Sato et al. (J Jpn Soc Food Sci Technol, Jpn 42:737–747, 1995) and Sato (HYDROCOLLOIDS, Edited by K. Nishinari, Elsevier Science B. V., Printed in the Netherlands, 269–274, 2000) investigated the effects of preparation conditions, mixing ratios, and cooking times on the physical properties of gomatofu. The previous papers indicated that gomatofu samples prepared by mixing sesame milk and kudzu starch at 250 rpm for 25 min had a uniform network structure (Sato et al., J Jpn Soc Food Sci Technol, Jpn 42:737–747, 1995). It was also found that gomatofu prepared with ingredients having a ratio of 40–50 g of kudzu starch to 40–60 g of sesame with 450 g of added water were palatable in softness, mouthfeel, and springiness (Sato et al., J Jpn Soc Food Sci Technol, Jpn 46:285–292, 1999). It can be seen that sesame components contribute to the strength and stability of kudzu gel starch (Sato et al., J Jpn Soc Food Sci Technol, Jpn 46:285–292, 1999), but a larger proportion of sesame contents decreased the cohesiveness due to the high level (55.9 %) of lipids in sesame seeds (Sato et al., J Jpn Soc Food Sci Technol, Jpn 42:871–877, 1995, J Jpn Soc Food Sci Technol, Jpn 46:367–375, 1999). Further, it was also found that favorable oil content was 3.4–6.4 % in the gomatofu (Sato et al., J Soc Rheol 33:101–108, 2003). The effects of roasting conditions of sesame seeds on the mechanical properties of gomatofu were investigated (Sato et al., J Home Econ, Jpn 58: 471–483, 2007). Overheating creates a burning smell, loss of flavor, and undesirable changes in the sesame components. The fracture stress increased at higher roasting temperatures because these fine particles of sesame have a filler effect, and they increased the elastic modulus of the gel. Sensory evaluation showed that gomatofu prepared with seeds roasted at 170 °C had best palatability. It was found that good mouthfeel is characterized by smoothness and is an important parameter in the texture of gomatofu.

Keywords

Preparation condition Texture Rheological properties Gomatofu 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Author would like to thank H. Watanabe working in Niigata Water Works Bureau where was examined by using SEM (Chilled Natural SEM-3500, Hitachi, Co) for observations, and T. Funami working in San-Eigen F.F.I., Inc. Osaka where was made by using Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyzer (SALD-2100, ShmadzuCo), for San-Ei Gen F.F.I., Inc. Japan.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Health and Nutrition, Human Life SciencePrefecture of Niigata UniversityNiigataJapan

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