Advertisement

Sustainability Education in Classrooms: Developing Teacher Expertise

  • Allan Harrison
  • Ken PurnellEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Schooling for Sustainable Development book series (SSDE, volume 3)

Abstract

Sustainability education will be in the fore of learning experiences for all Australian children and young people as the new national school curriculum is implemented. Commitment to sustainable patterns of living is one of the three cross curriculum perspectives (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA] 2010. Cross curriculum perspectives. http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/cross_curriculum_perspectives.html. Accessed 18 October 2010). The compulsory disciplines of science and geography provide the key curriculum, assessment and reporting areas for this. This chapter takes a fresh approach to sustainability education and uses epistemological questions to guide the reader’s thinking. We argue that decision-making on environmental issues must be based on quality evidence and robust analysis of that evidence. We conclude that while sustainability education has become a highly emotive and politicised area of debate and human activity, there is much that we can do as educators to contribute towards creating a preferred, sustainable future.-->

Keywords

Conceptual Change Alternative Conception Meaningful Learning Ozone Layer Depletion Intuitive Conception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA]. (2010). Cross curriculum perspectives. http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/cross_curriculum_perspectives.html. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  2. Australian Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. (2010). Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative (AuSSI). http://www.environment.gov.au/education/aussi/. Accessed 20 October 2010.
  3. Ausubel, D. P. (1968). Educational psychology: A cognitive view. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
  4. Burns, S. M. (1991). Social psychology and the stipulation of recycling behaviors: The block leader approach. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 21(8), 611–629.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Carey, S. (1985). Conceptual change in childhood. Cambridge: A Bradford Book, The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  6. Carey, S. (1991). Knowledge acquisition: Enrichment or conceptual change? In S. Carey & R. Gelman (Eds.), The epigenesis of mind: Essays on biology and cognition (pp. 257–291). Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  7. Champagne, A. B., Gunstone, R. F., & Klopfer, L. E. (1985). Effecting changes in cognitive structures among physics students. In L. H. T. West & A. L. Pines (Eds.), Cognitive structure and conceptual change (pp. 163–188). Orlando: Academic.Google Scholar
  8. Chi, M. T. H., Slotta, J. T., & de Leeuw, N. (1994). From things to processes: A theory of conceptual change for learning science concepts. Learning and Instruction, 4, 27–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Clement, J., Brown, D. E., & Zeitsman, A. (1989). Not all preconceptions are misconceptions: Finding ‘anchoring conceptions’ for grounding instruction on students’ intuition. International Journal of Science Education, 11(Special Issue), 554–565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Cosgrove, M., & Osborne, R. (1985). A teaching sequence on electric current. In R. Osborne & P. Freyberg (Eds.), Learning in science: The implications of children’s science. Auckland: Heinemann.Google Scholar
  11. Driver, R., Squires, A., Rushworth, P., & Wood-Robinson, V. (1994). Making sense of secondary science. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Duit, R., Goldberg, F., & Niedderer, H. (Eds.). (1992). Proceedings of an international workshop: Research in physics learning: Theoretical issues and empirical studies. Kiel: Institute for Science Education.Google Scholar
  13. Duschl, R. A., & Gitomer, D. H. (1991). Epistemological perspectives on conceptual change: Implications for educational practice. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 28, 839–858.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Gralton, A., Sinclair, M., & Purnell, K. (2004). Changes in attitudes, beliefs and behaviour: A critical review of research into the impacts of environmental education initiatives. Australian Journal of Environmental Education, 20(2), 41–52.Google Scholar
  15. Grayson, D. (1994). Concept substitution: An instructional strategy for promoting conceptual change. Research in Science Education, 24, 102–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Grayson, D. J. (1996). Concept substitution: A strategy for promoting conceptual change. In D. F. Treagust, R. Duit, & B. J. Fraser (Eds.), Improving teaching and learning in science and mathematics (pp. 152–161). New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  17. Gribbin, J. (1988). The whole in the sky. New York: Bantom Books.Google Scholar
  18. Guba, E. G., & Lincoln, Y. S. (1989). Fourth generation evaluation. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  19. Harrison, A. G., & Treagust, D. F. (1996). Secondary students’ mental models of atoms and molecules: Implications for teaching science. Science Education, 80, 509–534.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hashweh, M. Z. (1986). Toward an explanation of conceptual change. European Journal of Science Education, 8, 229–249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hewson, P. W. (1981). A conceptual change approach to learning science. European Journal of Science Education, 3, 383–396.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Hewson, P. W. (1982). A case study of conceptual change in special relativity: The influence of prior knowledge in learning. European Journal of Science Education, 4, 61–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Hewson, P. W. (1985). Diagnosis and remediation of an alternative conception of velocity using a microcomputer program. American Journal of Physics, 53, 684–690.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Hewson, P. W. (1996). Teaching for conceptual change. In D. F. Treagust, R. Duit, & B. J. Fraser (Eds.), Improving teaching and learning in science and mathematics (pp. 131–140). New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  25. Hewson, P. W., & Hewson, M. G. A’. B. (1984). The role of conceptual conflict in conceptual change and the design of science instruction. Instructional Science, 13, 1–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Hewson, P. W., & Hewson, M. G. A’. B. (1992). The status of students’ conceptions. In R. Duit, F. Goldberg, & H. Niedderer (Eds.), Proceedings of an international workshop: Research in physics learning: Theoretical issues and empirical studies (pp. 59–73). Kiel: Institute for Science Education.Google Scholar
  27. Hewson, P. W., & Thorley, N. R. (1989). The conditions of conceptual change in the classroom. International Journal of Science Education, 11(Special Issue), 541–553.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Kuhn, T. S. (1970). Structure of scientific revolutions (2nd ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  29. Lakatos, I. (1970). Falsification and the methodology of scientific research programes. In I. Lakatos & A. Musgrave (Eds.), Criticism and the growth of knowledge (pp. 81–181). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1980). Metaphors we live by. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  31. Lane, R. (2009). Articulating the pedagogical content knowledge of accomplished geography teachers. Geographical Education, 22, 40–50.Google Scholar
  32. Latour, B., & Woolgar, S. (1986). Laboratory life. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Linn, M. C., & Songer, N. B. (1991). Teaching thermodynamics to middle school students. What are appropriate cognitive demands? Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 28, 885–918.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. McDermott, L. (1993). How we teach and how students learn. Australian and New Zealand Physicist, 30, 151–163.Google Scholar
  35. McKenzie-Mohr, D. (2000). Promoting sustainable behavior: An introduction to community-based social marketing. Journal of Social Issues, 56(3), 543.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Miles, R., & Purnell, K. N. (2005). Climate change: How real is it? The issues and implications. Geographical Education, 18, 31–45.Google Scholar
  37. Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs [MYCEETYA]. (2008). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf. Accessed 20 August 2010.
  38. New South Wales Government. (2010). Sustainable schools NSW. http://www.sustainableschools.nsw.edu.au/Default.aspx?tabid=565. Accessed 3 September 2010.
  39. Novak, J. (1984). Application of advances in learning theory and the philosophy of science to the improvement of chemistry teaching. Journal of Chemical Education, 61, 607–612.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Novick, S., & Nussbaum, J. (1981). Pupils’ understanding of the particulate nature of matter: A cross-age study. Science Education, 65, 187–196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Nussbaum, J., & Novick, S. (1982). Alternative frameworks, conceptual conflict and accommodation: Toward a principled teaching strategy. Instructional Science, 11, 183–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Ozturk, M., & Alkis, S. (2010). Misconceptions in geography. Geographical Education, 23, 56–64.Google Scholar
  43. Perry, W. G. (1970). Forms of intellectual and ethical development in the college years. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
  44. Pfundt, H., & Duit, R. (1994). Bibliography: Students alternative frameworks and science education (4th ed.). Kiel: Institute for Science Education.Google Scholar
  45. Pintrich, P. R., Marx, R. W., & Boyle, R. A. (1993). Beyond cold conceptual change: The role of motivational beliefs and classroom contextual factors in the process of conceptual change. Review of Educational Research, 63(2), 197–199.Google Scholar
  46. Posner, G. J., Strike, K. A., Hewson, P. W., & Gertzog, W. A. (1982). Accommodation of a scientific conception: Toward a theory of conceptual change. Science Education, 66, 211–227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Purnell, K. N. (2004). Creating sustainable futures through experiential learning in an energy efficiency in schools program. Geographical Education, 17, 40–51.Google Scholar
  48. Purnell, K. N. (2010). Geography teaching: Sharing the expertise. Geographical Education, 23, 41–58.Google Scholar
  49. Purnell, K., Sinclair, M., & Gralton, A. (2004). Sustainable schools: Making energy efficiency a lifestyle priority. Australian Journal of Environmental Education, 20(2), 81–91.Google Scholar
  50. Queensland Department of Education and Training. (2010). Queensland Environmentally Sustainable Schools Initiative (QESSI). http://education.qld.gov.au/schools/environment/outdoor/qessi.html. Accessed 20 October 2010.
  51. Schmidt, H.-J., Marohn, A., & Harrison, A. G. (2007). Factors that prevent learning in electrochemistry. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 44, 258–283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Scott, P. H. (1992). Conceptual pathways in learning science: A case study of one student’s ideas relating to the structure of matter. In R. Duit, F. Goldberg, & H. Niedderer (Eds.), Proceedings of an international workshop: Research in physics learning: Theoretical issues and empirical studies (pp. 203–224). Kiel: Institute for Science Education.Google Scholar
  53. Scripps Institution of Oceanography NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. (2011). Atmospheric CO 2 at Mauna Loa. http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends. Accessed 12 January 2011.
  54. Skemp, R. R. (1976). Relational understanding and instrumental understanding. Mathematics Teaching, 77, 20–26.Google Scholar
  55. Solomon, J. (1987). Social influences on the construction of pupils’ understanding of science. Studies in Science Education, 14, 63–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Strike, K. A., & Posner, G. J. (1985). A conceptual change view of learning and understanding. In L. West & L. Pines (Eds.), Cognitive structure and conceptual change (pp. 259–266). Orlando: Academic.Google Scholar
  57. Strike, K. A., & Posner, G. J. (1992). A revisionist theory of conceptual change. In R. A. Duschl & R. J. Hamilton (Eds.), Philosophy of science, cognitive psychology, and educational theory and practice (pp. 147–176). New York: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
  58. Tabert, S., & Purnell, K. (2007). Making energy a priority in schools: An evaluation of the Queensland solar schools initiative. In B. A. Knight, B. Walker-Gibbs, & J. Delamoir (Eds.), Research into 21st century communities (pp. 205–217). Teneriffe: Post Pressed.Google Scholar
  59. Thagard, P. (1992). Conceptual revolutions. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  60. Tobin, K. (Ed.). (1993). The practice of constructivism in science education. Washington: American Association for the Advancement of Science Press.Google Scholar
  61. Toulmin, S. (1972). Human understanding (Vol. I). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  62. UNESCO. (2005). UN decade for education for sustainable development (2005–2014). http://www.unesco.org/en/esd/. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  63. van der Veer, R., & Valsiner, J. (1994). The Vygotsky reader. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  64. von Glasersfeld, E. (1995). A constructivist approach to teaching. In L. P. Steffe & J. Gale (Eds.), Constructivism in education (pp. 3–15). Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.Google Scholar
  65. Vosniadou, S. (1994). Capturing and modelling the process of conceptual change. Learning and Instruction, 4, 45–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Woods R. A., & Skumatz, L. A. (2004). Self-efficacy in conservation: Relationship between conservation behavior and beliefs about the ability to make a difference. http://www.eceee.org/conference_proceedings/ACEEE_buildings/2004. Accessed 3 September 2010.
  67. Yager, R. (1991). The constructivist learning model. The Science Teacher, 58, 52–57.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Education, Central Queensland UniversityQLDAustralia
  2. 2.Central Queensland UniversityQLDAustralia

Personalised recommendations