Advertisement

Workers’ Compensation Standards

  • C. Arthur WilliamsJr.
Chapter
  • 51 Downloads
Part of the Huebner International Series on Risk, Insurance, and Economic Security book series (HSRI, volume 11)

Abstract

Two sets of standards have been developed for evaluating workers’ compensation programs. The first, which is the more relevant for international comparisons, is Convention 121 (Convention Concerning Benefits in the Case of Employment Injury) adopted in 1964 by the General Conference of the International Labor Organization. The second set was proposed in the United States in 1972 by the National Commission on State Workmen’s Compensation Laws. Although directed toward state programs in that nation, the Commission’s recommendations are also relevant because they were based on 60 years of experience, at first with programs in only a few jurisdictions but, since 1948, with diversified programs in all 50 states plus the District of Columbia and two federal programs—one covering federal government employees and the other covering longshore and harbor workers.

Keywords

International Labor Organization National Commission Occupational Disease Disability Benefit Wage Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Berkowitz M., and Burton, John F., Jr. Permanent Disability Benefits in Workers’ Compensation. Kalamazoo: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research 1987.Google Scholar
  2. International Labor Conference, Forty-Eighth Session. Benefits in the Case of Industrial Accidents and Occupational Disease, Reports V(l) and V(2). Geneva: International Labor Office, 1964.Google Scholar
  3. International Labor Organization. Chart of Ratifications of International Labour Conventions, I January 1988. Geneva: International Labor Office, 1988.Google Scholar
  4. International Labor Organization. Convention 121: Concerning Benefits In the Case of Employment Injury. Geneva: International Labor Office, 1964.Google Scholar
  5. International Labor Organization. International Labor Conventions and Recommendations, 1919-1981. Geneva: International Labor Office, 1982.Google Scholar
  6. International Labor Organization. Recommendation 121: Recommendation Concerning Benefits In the Case of Employment Injury. Geneva: International Labor Office, 1964.Google Scholar
  7. National Commission on State Workmen’s Compensation Laws. Report of the.... Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1972.Google Scholar
  8. National Commission on State Workmen’s Compensation Laws. Compendium on Workmen’s Compensation. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1973.Google Scholar
  9. Workers’ Compensation: Is There A Better Way? A Report on the Need for Reform of State Workers, Compensation by The Policy Group of the Interdepartmental Workers’ Compensation Task Force, January 19, 1977.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Arthur WilliamsJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Curtis L. Carlson School of ManagementUniversity of MinnesotaUSA

Personalised recommendations