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Abstract

Hybrid systems are combinations of two different types of polymers in the form of a cold mix or precondensate. These combinations unite certain properties of both components which could not be obtained in a single polymer alone (e.g. epoxy-resin-based compounds have many excellent properties including rapid curing at normal temperatures, good adhesion to most surfaces, toughness and chemical resistance to many dilute acids, alkalis and solvents). The incorporation of a polysulphide component into an epoxy resin leads to the improvement of certain properties without adversely affecting the existing performance capabilities of the epoxy system (Rees et al., 1994). The benefits from such modifications include viscosity reduction, enhancement of adhesion, introduction of flexibility, improved impact strength, thermal shock resistance, improved water and corrosion resistance, controlled damping characteristics and improved chemical resistance (Rees and Wilford, 1994).

Keywords

Fumed Silica Diglycidyl Ether Epoxy System Epoxy Coating Hybrid Polymer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. H. Irfan

There are no affiliations available

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